FAQ

What are floating granite fountains?

These custom-designed interactive sculptural water features are finely crafted, perfectly balanced objects set in a socket that is carved to the exact curvature of the object. They float and spin on a thin film of water. A monumental design feature often weighing many tons their inviting qualities create a hands-on focal point that attracts people and piques their curiosity. And, they are simply beautiful.

  • The Kugel (right) is always in the shape of a ball and revolves in all directions. When the sphere is engraved with the map of the world it can be engineered to turn on the approximate axis of the Earth.

  • The Disc supports a three-dimensional sculpture of virtually any shape or size geometric, lifelike or free-form. It floats horizontally on a base.

  • The Wheel is a perfectly balanced solid vertical disc that revolves in a shallow  base socket.

  • The Ring is a perfectly balanced vertical disc with the center cut out, resembling a donut, that revolves in a shallow base socket.

All may be customized with diamond-engraved designs perhaps a map of the world or a corporate logo.

How do they work?

Water pumped up from beneath the socket lubricates the sculpture, forcing it to turn gently. Thus begun, the feature stone continues to revolve until the water supply is shut off.

The process of fashioning the socket and floating object is exacting. Measurements and movements must be precise. Mistakes must be non-existent. The two pieces are machined at the same time to assure that there are only minute differences between the contours of the two surfaces. The floating fountain must be perfectly balanced in order to rotate properly.

So what?

No belts, no pulleys, no rubber wheels are involved in the rotation of these sculptures. The pressure of the pump is an incredibly low 14 psi to 21 psi (pounds per square inch). And these are very weighty objects. We can make them from 1 foot in diameter, weighing 84 pounds, to nearly 10 feet in diameter, weighing 40 tons! Yet even a child can change the course of a floating ball and set it on an accelerated twirl, only to return to its normal rotation when left alone.

A small child! Isn't that dangerous?

About as dangerous as a rubber duckie. The space between the feature stone and the socket is thinner than your business card.

 

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